johnwastaken replied to your post: johnwastaken replied to your post: joh…

Working at Starbucks you might as well be unemployed. Don’t do it. Apply to any other coffee place. Unless you need health insurance, then I guess go ahead and work at Starbucks. And la isn’t so bad…. It’s just… Big.

I’m casting a wide net, applying to anyplace really. And I don’t have a problem with how large LA is (well, I think it is impractical because of water resource issues and I also hate it’s urban, or rather, suburban form), I can see myself doing well in actual cities like Chicago, NYC, and Toronto. At least in those places I wouldn’t need a car.

johnwastaken replied to your post: johnwastaken I don’t think you underst…

I do. I am currently living in it. :( and la is awesome.

Really? Because you said “move to LA. that’s my suggestion. we can be unemployed roommates working at starbucks. it will be grand.” (emphasis mine). You can’t be unemployed and working. It’s not possible! And you know how I feel about LA.

Side note, I’m applying to Starbucks locations here in Cleveland. Doubt I’ll land a job there though. 

wisforwonder replied to your post: johnwastaken I don’t think you underst…

Thank goodness you’re rational.

Yeah, there aren’t many places I would want to live in the U.S. My list includes:

  • Cleveland
  • New York City
  • Philadelphia
  • Boston
  • Portland
  • Seattle
  • San Francisco-Oakland 
  • Washington D.C.
  • Baltimore
  • Chicago
  • Minneapolis-St. Paul
  • Milwaukee
  • Pittsburgh
  • Cincinnati  
  • Denver
  • Detroit

That’s pretty much it. Cincinnati and D.C. are basically the farthest south I’d be willing to go. But maybe I shouldn’t be so picky. Worse case scenario…if after a year in Cleveland I do not find a job in my field, I might have to be less selective…might even have to get a job in a small town somewhere (I’ve seen a lot of job postings for planners in small towns throughout the U.S.) or might have to consider cities like Columbus or cities in the south.

johnwastaken I don’t think you understand what unemployed means.

wisforwonder but my roommate and I already talked about it…well she had me talk to my friend who might move in…Nicole wanted an answer. I made it clear that my friend still wasn’t a definite but I’m afraid Nicole has already begun to make plans to move.

It really might be best to just get her out. I’ll have money to pay for rent and I’ve been applying to jobs, maybe something will stick.

I’m freaking out a bit.

I’ve been so consumed with anxiety and stress lately and it’s driving me crazy. As soon as I think I’ve come to a decision on something, I change my mind and start to freak out.

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wetheurban:

ART: Shipping Containers Painted With Greek God and Goddess Murals by Pichi & Avo
Spanish street art duo, Pichi & Avo’s participation in the North West Walls street art festival in Belgium resulted in this staggering, jaw-dropping mural.
Read More
wetheurban:

ART: Shipping Containers Painted With Greek God and Goddess Murals by Pichi & Avo
Spanish street art duo, Pichi & Avo’s participation in the North West Walls street art festival in Belgium resulted in this staggering, jaw-dropping mural.
Read More
wetheurban:

ART: Shipping Containers Painted With Greek God and Goddess Murals by Pichi & Avo
Spanish street art duo, Pichi & Avo’s participation in the North West Walls street art festival in Belgium resulted in this staggering, jaw-dropping mural.
Read More
wetheurban:

ART: Shipping Containers Painted With Greek God and Goddess Murals by Pichi & Avo
Spanish street art duo, Pichi & Avo’s participation in the North West Walls street art festival in Belgium resulted in this staggering, jaw-dropping mural.
Read More

wetheurban:

ART: Shipping Containers Painted With Greek God and Goddess Murals by Pichi & Avo

Spanish street art duo, Pichi & Avo’s participation in the North West Walls street art festival in Belgium resulted in this staggering, jaw-dropping mural.

Read More

mpdrolet:

W 37Th St. 8Th Ave, NY

Christopher Woodcock

thisiscitylab:

Meanwhile, New York faces a capacity problem. The city is expected to add one million residents over the next few decades, and river crossings—a key barrier separating where people live from where they work—are increasingly nearing capacity. Economically, the city can’t support construction that costs more than $2 billion per mile and takes a decade to build out a mere two of them. And New Yorkers are facing a future where political inaction could prevent badly needed subway expansion projects from seeing the light of day.  

As a knee-jerk reaction to the issues, leaders have begun to think small. They propose ferries, with ridership that tops a few hundred per day, as opposed to a few hundred thousand per day for a full-length Second Avenue subway. They urge bus rapid transit as a lower-cost option, without discussing how lower costs inevitably lead to lower capacity. Only subway lines can sustain New York’s projected growth, but New York can’t sustain multi-billion-dollar subway lines. 

-NYC Can’t Afford to Build the Second Avenue Subway, and It Can’t Afford Not To

[Image: MTA]